Cricut Basics



While I primarily love working with fabrics and fibers, I absolutely love my Cricut. I especially love it for making t-shirts and other wearable custom pieces.


I loved loved loved going online and learning from various makers and artists, so I wanted to compile three of my favorite techniques on the Cricut machine, especially for those who might've gotten this bad boy as a Christmas gift!


Also, I wanted to note (as I do in the photo captions) that I did adapt this post from a few older posts that were on my previous website. While I could have definitely redone the photos, there's something kind of fun about using the older, not-so-great pictures. It makes me smile to see my progress. Don't worry, the pictures aren't so terrible you can't tell what's happening! But they herald a less ~professional~ Hannah, and I love it.


Heat Transfer Vinyl


The design in this tutorial is what I used to make shirts for a friend's bachelorette party. The quote was her idea, and the font is "Affectionately Yours" that I got from DaFont.com.


1) Make your design and find your vinyl.





2) Stick your vinyl on your cutting surface front/shiny side down.



Note: This post was adapted from another post on my old site. The photos are a little ~outdated~ but they serve.


3) Before you cut, make sure you mirror the image!





4) Cut.



Note: This post was adapted from another post on my old site. The photos are a little ~outdated~ but they serve.

5) Peel off slowly.



Note: This post was adapted from another post on my old site. The photos are a little ~outdated~ but they serve.


6) Fix onto fabric and iron it on thoroughly for about 30 seconds.



Note: This post was adapted from another post on my old site. The photos are a little ~outdated~ but they serve.


Done.



Removing Heat Transfer Vinyl


Okay so we all f*ck up sometimes, both philosophically but also quite literally. That 100000% happens when you're creating. Thankfully, I figured out how to remedy those mistakes after you've ironed them on.


All you need are an iron and wax paper:



Um, this was before I remodeled. Please pardon the brown.

Once the iron is hot, begin by putting the waxy side of the paper down over the vinyl.




Press down and after a couple of seconds, remove the wax paper. The vinyl should come off onto the wax paper, but if it doesn't, you can usually just grab it and pull it off with your fingers.




I've done it a million times, and it has worked every single time!



Contact Paper Stencil


When I want to make a sign or something for my house, a gift, or whatever, I love to use this technique for creating a stencil that you can paint in. The reason I use contact paper is because that paper will stick to the surface your painting, minimizing movement and thus, any bleeding.


First thing’s first, create your design in your cutting software.




Next, lay your contact paper out on your mat with the right side up and cut it.


Once it’s cut, peel it off the mat very carefully, leaving the cut out pieces on the mat or discard them as they come off. You should be left with only the outline of your cut.

Now that you have the outline, stick it on the clean surface you’re painting, smoothing out all bubbles and wrinkles.



Using the sponge brush, start dabbing your paint on your stencil. I found that using this type of brush with a dabbing technique minimizes errors. The brush lets out less paint than a regular brush, and the dabbing keeps you from peeling the contact paper up, like you could with up and down strokes.

After the stencil is completely covered with “dabs,” go ahead and gently smooth any clumps or bubbles. Just make the paint smooth, and once that’s done, let it dry.




After it’s dry, slowly peel off the contact paper.




And voila!



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